7 things you're doing wrong when creating a WordPress contact form

A contact form is an important part of your website - it allows the potential customers to inquire about products, clear up some things they might not understand about licensing, or report a problem they faced.

It follows that it should be your priority to create the contact form correctly. That means avoiding the following:

1) Fields, fields everywhere

Hey, remember how fun it was to fill out that tax declaration last year? Wait, what do you mean it wasn't?

If an user wants to ask a question about your product, because they haven't quite decided on making the purchase yet, do you really think they would like to fill 128 fields just to get in touch with you? No, forms that are too long scare the users away, so keep it as short as possible.

2) You're on your phone? Tough luck.

Every year, more and more web traffic is coming from mobile devices. If your form is hard or nearly impossible to use on a phone you will lose conversions, and then, in turn - sales.

Make sure that your contact form is as easy to use on a mobile as it is on your desktop, please.

3) ULOTMA (Unclear labeles or too many abbreviations)

While it might make complete sense to you that the field named "FN" actually means "Full Name", it might not be so obvious to your user.

Label your fields properly, avoid using strange abbreviations that only you will understand.

A good way to test whether your form is clear and makes sense to the visitors is to do the "hallway test". Grab a random person that is not connected with the project from a hallway and make them send a message through the contact form. If at any point they say something along the lines of "Okay, now what?", then you did it wrong.

4) Tell me everything!

Sure, knowing that your user's pet name was "Cpt. Fluffycuddles" might be useful in the future (although we cannot come up with an answer as to why), but the main goal of your contact form is to... well, establish contact between you and the user. Quite obvious, isn't it?

And while having your users' mobile numbers might come in handy, many people are uncomfortable with supplying you with such information.

Keep it simple and don't ask for too much effort from the user, seriously.

5) Too strict validation

Oh, sorry, your phone number is 10 digits instead of the 9 we assumed? Nope, can't let you through.

Make sure you account for all the possible format of data you request from the user. Keep in mind that some places write the date down differently, some places use metric while others measure things in imperial.

Let your validation be as forgiving as it possibly can be, so as not to force your user to re-input the required information 42 times.

6) Bad button placement/labelling

See this "Reset all I've just entered" button? Why is it half an inch away from the "submit" button? Why is it even there?

If you absolutely insist on having the "reset" button, place it so it cannot be accidentally clicked while trying to submit the contact form. No one likes to have the message they were carefully constructing over the last 15 minutes just deleted because of a simple misclick.

By the way, consider using something more appropriate than "Submit". It's too generic and doesn't look that good. Pick something that fits this specific contact form and the style (formal/informal) of your whole website.

7) It's simply not working

Have you ever actually tested you contact form? Is everything set-up properly? You'd be surprised how often you'll find plain-broken contact forms online.

Send yourself a test message right after turning the contact form on - better safe than sorry ;)

Now that you know what are the common mistakes you also know how to avoid them and make sure your conversion rate is high. So what are you waiting for? Grab the Perfect Easy & Powerful Contact Form for WordPress and start drawing in customers!